A history of dubious Euro mascots

Remember these? We do...
Euro cup 2016
Pinocchio (Italy 1980) - When it comes to designing a mascot, was there any doubt that the Italians would excel? Combining a childhood-favourite fable with football, some bright colours and a small paper hat may sound ridiculous, but when designed by an Italian, it looks so right.
Pinocchio (Italy 1980) - When it comes to designing a mascot, was there any doubt that the Italians would excel? Combining a childhood-favourite fable with football, some bright colours and a small paper hat may sound ridiculous, but when designed by an Italian, it looks so right.
Goaliath  (England 1996) - The English are known to love a clever bit of word-play, so sure enough the naming of the Euro ’96 mascot celebrated that. It’s a pity that Goaliath the Lion wasn’t wearing the necessary kit to help him play the game. Denim shorts, sir? Shame on you.
Goaliath (England 1996) - The English are known to love a clever bit of word-play, so sure enough the naming of the Euro ’96 mascot celebrated that. It’s a pity that Goaliath the Lion wasn’t wearing the necessary kit to help him play the game. Denim shorts, sir? Shame on you.
Benelucky (Belgium/Netherlands 2000) - Benelucky is a lion-devil (which is a thing, apparently) whose colourful mane merged the flags of the two host countries. Its cuddly look and goofy smile downplayed its more natural instinct to kill and maim its victims — a trait that it seemingly had in common with both the underperforming Belgian and Dutch teams.
Benelucky (Belgium/Netherlands 2000) - Benelucky is a lion-devil (which is a thing, apparently) whose colourful mane merged the flags of the two host countries. Its cuddly look and goofy smile downplayed its more natural instinct to kill and maim its victims — a trait that it seemingly had in common with both the underperforming Belgian and Dutch teams.
Trix and Flix (Austria/Switzerland 2008) - We can only assume that the organisers of the Austro-Swiss European championship were fans of The X Factor berks Jedward. Granted, the Irish twins wouldn’t find fame until the following year, but there can be no other logical explanation for this horrendous attempt at a football mascot.
Trix and Flix (Austria/Switzerland 2008) - We can only assume that the organisers of the Austro-Swiss European championship were fans of The X Factor berks Jedward. Granted, the Irish twins wouldn’t find fame until the following year, but there can be no other logical explanation for this horrendous attempt at a football mascot.
Super Victor (France 2016) - We know that it is our job to shed light on the backgrounds of mascots from Euros gone by, but frankly we’re stumped as to why a cape-wearing astronaut was picked to represent this summer’s tournament. His name was selected by public vote, which thankfully avoided opting for the proposed ‘Driblou’.
Super Victor (France 2016) - We know that it is our job to shed light on the backgrounds of mascots from Euros gone by, but frankly we’re stumped as to why a cape-wearing astronaut was picked to represent this summer’s tournament. His name was selected by public vote, which thankfully avoided opting for the proposed ‘Driblou’.
Euro cup 2016
Pinocchio (Italy 1980) - When it comes to designing a mascot, was there any doubt that the Italians would excel? Combining a childhood-favourite fable with football, some bright colours and a small paper hat may sound ridiculous, but when designed by an Italian, it looks so right.
Goaliath  (England 1996) - The English are known to love a clever bit of word-play, so sure enough the naming of the Euro ’96 mascot celebrated that. It’s a pity that Goaliath the Lion wasn’t wearing the necessary kit to help him play the game. Denim shorts, sir? Shame on you.
Benelucky (Belgium/Netherlands 2000) - Benelucky is a lion-devil (which is a thing, apparently) whose colourful mane merged the flags of the two host countries. Its cuddly look and goofy smile downplayed its more natural instinct to kill and maim its victims — a trait that it seemingly had in common with both the underperforming Belgian and Dutch teams.
Trix and Flix (Austria/Switzerland 2008) - We can only assume that the organisers of the Austro-Swiss European championship were fans of The X Factor berks Jedward. Granted, the Irish twins wouldn’t find fame until the following year, but there can be no other logical explanation for this horrendous attempt at a football mascot.
Super Victor (France 2016) - We know that it is our job to shed light on the backgrounds of mascots from Euros gone by, but frankly we’re stumped as to why a cape-wearing astronaut was picked to represent this summer’s tournament. His name was selected by public vote, which thankfully avoided opting for the proposed ‘Driblou’.
08June2016